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Mercian coins and shards of pottery from the Rhineland dating from the 8th century suggest that long-distance trade was happening long before this.

Between 924 and 939, Norwich became fully established as a town, with its own mint.

It also records the site of an Anglo-Saxon church in Tombland, the site of the Saxon market place and the later Norman cathedral.

Norwich continued to be a major centre for trade, the River Wensum being a convenient export route to the River Yare and Great Yarmouth, which served as the port for Norwich.

At the time of the Norman Conquest the city was one of the largest in England.

The Domesday Book states that it had approximately 25 churches and a population of between 5,000 and 10,000.

The word Norvic appears on coins across Europe minted during this period, in the reign of King Athelstan.

The Vikings were a strong cultural influence in Norwich for 40 to 50 years at the end of the 9th century, setting up an Anglo-Scandinavian district near the north end of present day King Street.

Pilgrims made offerings to a shrine at the Cathedral (largely finished by 1140) up to the 16th century, but the records suggest there were few of them. In February 1190, all the Jews of Norwich were massacred except for a few who found refuge in the castle.

The parliamentary seats cross over into adjacent local-government districts.

A total of 132,512 (2011 census) people live in the City of Norwich and the population of the Norwich Travel to Work Area (i.e., the self-contained labour market area in and around Norwich in which most people live and commute to work) is 282,000 (mid-2009 estimate).

The chief building material for the Cathedral was limestone, imported from Caen in Normandy.

To transport the building stone to the site, a canal was cut from the river (from the site of present-day Pulls Ferry), all the way up to the east wall.

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